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Indian ‘Certainties’ Revisited – and the Changes They Will Drive

Indian ‘Certainties’ Revisited – and the Changes They Will Drive

One year ago, the Sign of the Times laid out what we believed were 12 ‘certainties’ that had the potential to transform India by 2025, based on a number of broader demographic, social, economic, and political macro-themes. These ‘certainties’ of India have the potential to create the next big global player in economics and politics. A closer look at the ‘certainties’ however reveals that while some of them were indeed certain, particularly those related to demographics, others among the 12, such as the economic predictions, were directionally correct but more dependent on India getting key policy actions right along the way, as was highlighted in the Sign at the time. Next month’s Sign of the Times provides the key economic metrics and their impact beyond 2025, up through the point when India can be expected to emerge as a middle-income country around 2040. In addition to benchmarking the rate and scale of change to other middle income and developed countries, next month’s Leader will examine where the country is headed, both in terms of what India will look like and what its likely impact on the world might be. As a prelude to this analysis this month’s Sign of the Times revisits the original certainties and the policy priorities that will enable India’s trajectory and the transformation it will drive.

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The Commonwealth 2.0: An Opportunity for India to Lead May 2018

For almost 70 years the Commonwealth of Nations, formerly the British Commonwealth, has linked together one third of humanity in a loose confederation of states based on shared history and shared values. However, the Commonwealth project for decades has fallen short of its potential, due to both a lack of leadership and to the nature of the institution itself, being a free association of equal members with no permanent governance organs. Nevertheless, the economic, political and security potential of the Commonwealth remains considerable at a time when existing geopolitical alliances and institutions generally are in flux with a vacillating America and an increasingly assertive China. India, the Commonwealth’s largest and arguably most dynamic member, has seen its prospects and standing revitalised under the current government and therefore has an opportunity to step up and be one of the leaders in the transformation of the bloc into a positive force for development, security and prosperity in the world.

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India’s States: A Re-alignment Towards Growth April 2018

The Narendra Modi-led BJP government is close to completing its first term in office, having implemented a series of far-reaching policy reforms during the past three years. During this time the political complexion of the country has radically changed, with control of many state legislatures changing hands (largely to the BJP), and the emergence of new regional leaders who are now driving key states like Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh and Tamil Nadu, among others. While large metro and city-centric states including Maharashtra, Delhi, Tamil Nadu and Gujarat continue to remain the biggest drivers of growth within the country, several states further behind on the growth trajectory appear to be catching up. In July 2015, the Sign of the Times evaluated a series of growth, risk and scale related metrics across India’s states with a view towards analysing the vast economic and social differences within the country, as well as the implications of these inter- and intra-regional differences for policymakers and investors. This month’s Sign of the Times revisits and updates this original analysis to identify the key changes in the relative position of India’s states and how the country’s landscape has changed, as well as the implications of these changes for investment strategy and policy.

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Digital Shock: India’s Opportunity to Create a new Healthcare System and save US$50bn March 2018

In India, the provision of modern healthcare to 1.3bn people is one of the biggest challenges facing the country today and a priority for its government. Poor access to credible information, physicians and pharmacies, inadequate hospital infrastructure, and the continued prevalence of fundamentally preventable life-threatening diseases represent systemic and significant fundamental challenges in a country where per-capita healthcare spending remains among the lowest even among emerging market economies. Solving these challenges in a timely and capital efficient manner will require developing a series of radical solutions, for which the variable that stands between failure and success is technology.

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