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In a world with 9 billion inter-connected people, power will come from creating peace, prosperity and freedom and this will require breakthroughs in how we live, enabled by a transformation in the very definition of power itself



THE WORLD AND THE FUTURE

The Shape of the World to Come – Part III: The Path to a New World Order
The Shape of the World to Come – Part III: The Path to a New World Order

The third part of our series on the Shape of the World to Come attempts to describe the transition to and the shape of the New World Order.  In this undertaking, we examine the opportunity for a peaceful transition to the future and the potential for a violent one.

The Shape of the World to Come – Part II:  The Key Challenges Facing the World
The Shape of the World to Come – Part II: The Key Challenges Facing the World

The second part of our series on the Shape of the World to Come presents the big issues that are driving people to support more extreme positions at the electoral box.  These issues might not only undermine some of the important progress achieved but also set the path for a new world order to emerge from conflict and competition.

The Shape of the World to Come – Part I: How the World is Progressing
The Shape of the World to Come – Part I: How the World is Progressing

In the first of a three part series on the Shape of the World to Come the Sign looks at the key elements of progress made globally.  Despite the challenges facing the world today, we live in a time of unprecedented progress and improving lives across a number of critical dimensions.

The US Election in Context – We Live in Revolutionary Times: The Prelude to the New World Order
The US Election in Context – We Live in Revolutionary Times: The Prelude to the New World Order

Both the Trump and Brexit votes have taken place within the context of revolutionary history. Looking ahead there is the potential for more revolutions to come, with significant implications for the world.

South China Seas: With Greater Power Comes Greater Responsibility
South China Seas: With Greater Power Comes Greater Responsibility

The ruling by the international tribunal in the Hague on the South China Seas dispute between the Philippines and China has significant potential security implications.  If not well handled, the ruling bears wide ranging risks for China on sovereignty disputes with India, Japan and almost all its neighbours and in domestic matters too.

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FROM THE FRONTLINE OF CHANGE

Featured : Addressing India’s Literacy Challenge A brief discussion with Sourav Banerjee, India Country Director for Room to Read, a global non-profit organisation whose mission is to tackle the problem of childhood literacy across the developing world

Addressing India’s Literacy Challenge

The Sign of the Times has written extensively about the importance of education and skill development for India to fully realise its demographic advantage and thereby achieve economic development. Approximately a quarter of India’s population is illiterate, and by virtue of its sheer size, India has the largest illiterate population in the world, accounting for c.40% of the world’s illiterate population. This is disproportionately skewed towards women and girls, approximately a third of whom lack even basic literacy skills, and has therefore limited women’s ability to choose how they participate in the economy.

Addressing India’s literacy and education challenges, along with the large gender gap, clearly requires transformative solutions. In this context, Greater Pacific Capital talks to Sourav Banerjee, Country Director for Room to Read in India. Room to Read is a global non-profit organisation whose mission is to tackle the problem of childhood literacy across the developing world.

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Image 5 The Frontline

Revolution and Information Revolution

Revolution and the Information Revolution

A brief discussion with Jon Miller, the former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Digital Media Group and Chief Digital Officer for News Corporation.

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Reflections on India in the BRICs; Who You Calling a BRIC?

Reflections on India and the BRICS; who you calling a BRIC

Interview with and article by Jim O’Neill, the former chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management who coined the term “BRICS”.

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Interpreting Gandhi’s Principles of Non-Violence for Today’s World

Interpreting Gandhi’s Principles of Non-Violence for Today’s World

Lecture by Rajni Bakshi, Gandhi Peace Fellow at Gateway House: Indian Council on Global Relations

Archived Articles

Pointing to the Future in       May 2017

Pointing to the Future

The Right Way to Nurture India’s Digital Economy. The Indian digital economy offers tremendous potential for growth if appropriate policies are put in place, Carnegie India reports.

Modi Diplomacy, Part II. Few would disagree with the proposition that Prime Minister Modi has had a great run with foreign policy over the last three years, but to sustain India’s rise Delhi must shift its engagement to another level

Can the U.S. Pivot Back to Asia? How Trump should respond to China’s Belt and Road Initiative

Adrift in the South China Sea. The potentially high cost of stopping US freedom of navigation operations in the South China Sea

China’s Soft Power Offensive and its Limitations. A three part post from the Council on Foreign Relations (subsequent posts here and here) on China’s attempts to bolster its soft power and its prospects for success.

A New Model for Chinese Overseas Investment. China has overtaken Japan as the world’s second largest overseas investor, but to be successful its companies will need to both align with China’s national priorities as well as invest wisely and sustainably

A Vision of Trump at War. The Council on Foreign Relations warns that Trump’s erratic style and confrontational policies could destroy an already fragile world order and lead to open conflict

Xi Jinping’s Economic Policy: The Gift from Donald Trump. Xi Jinping’s key narratives in the run-up to the 19th Party Congress this fall, that the Chinese economy is growing stably, economic reform is moving forward, and that a rising China is playing a more important role on the global scene, is being aided by Trump’s foreign policy

China’s Imperial Overreach. In a sense, OBOR seems to represent the dawn of a new colonial era – the twenty-first-century equivalent of the East India Company, which paved the way for British imperialism in the East. But, if China is building an empire, it seems already to have succumbed to what the historian Paul Kennedy famously called “imperial overstretch.”