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In a world with 9 billion inter-connected people, power will come from creating peace, prosperity and freedom and this will require breakthroughs in how we live, enabled by a transformation in the very definition of power itself



THE WORLD AND THE FUTURE

The Shape of the World to Come – Part III: The Path to a New World Order
The Shape of the World to Come – Part III: The Path to a New World Order

The third part of our series on the Shape of the World to Come attempts to describe the transition to and the shape of the New World Order.  In this undertaking, we examine the opportunity for a peaceful transition to the future and the potential for a violent one.

The Shape of the World to Come – Part II:  The Key Challenges Facing the World
The Shape of the World to Come – Part II: The Key Challenges Facing the World

The second part of our series on the Shape of the World to Come presents the big issues that are driving people to support more extreme positions at the electoral box.  These issues might not only undermine some of the important progress achieved but also set the path for a new world order to emerge from conflict and competition.

The Shape of the World to Come – Part I: How the World is Progressing
The Shape of the World to Come – Part I: How the World is Progressing

In the first of a three part series on the Shape of the World to Come the Sign looks at the key elements of progress made globally.  Despite the challenges facing the world today, we live in a time of unprecedented progress and improving lives across a number of critical dimensions.

The US Election in Context – We Live in Revolutionary Times: The Prelude to the New World Order
The US Election in Context – We Live in Revolutionary Times: The Prelude to the New World Order

Both the Trump and Brexit votes have taken place within the context of revolutionary history. Looking ahead there is the potential for more revolutions to come, with significant implications for the world.

South China Seas: With Greater Power Comes Greater Responsibility
South China Seas: With Greater Power Comes Greater Responsibility

The ruling by the international tribunal in the Hague on the South China Seas dispute between the Philippines and China has significant potential security implications.  If not well handled, the ruling bears wide ranging risks for China on sovereignty disputes with India, Japan and almost all its neighbours and in domestic matters too.

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FROM THE FRONTLINE OF CHANGE

Featured : Addressing India’s Literacy Challenge A brief discussion with Sourav Banerjee, India Country Director for Room to Read, a global non-profit organisation whose mission is to tackle the problem of childhood literacy across the developing world

Addressing India’s Literacy Challenge

The Sign of the Times has written extensively about the importance of education and skill development for India to fully realise its demographic advantage and thereby achieve economic development. Approximately a quarter of India’s population is illiterate, and by virtue of its sheer size, India has the largest illiterate population in the world, accounting for c.40% of the world’s illiterate population. This is disproportionately skewed towards women and girls, approximately a third of whom lack even basic literacy skills, and has therefore limited women’s ability to choose how they participate in the economy.

Addressing India’s literacy and education challenges, along with the large gender gap, clearly requires transformative solutions. In this context, Greater Pacific Capital talks to Sourav Banerjee, Country Director for Room to Read in India. Room to Read is a global non-profit organisation whose mission is to tackle the problem of childhood literacy across the developing world.

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Image 5 The Frontline

Revolution and Information Revolution

Revolution and the Information Revolution

A brief discussion with Jon Miller, the former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Digital Media Group and Chief Digital Officer for News Corporation.

PTF 2

Reflections on India in the BRICs; Who You Calling a BRIC?

Reflections on India and the BRICS; who you calling a BRIC

Interview with and article by Jim O’Neill, the former chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management who coined the term “BRICS”.

Frontline 3

Interpreting Gandhi’s Principles of Non-Violence for Today’s World

Interpreting Gandhi’s Principles of Non-Violence for Today’s World

Lecture by Rajni Bakshi, Gandhi Peace Fellow at Gateway House: Indian Council on Global Relations

Archived Articles

Pointing to the Future in      April 2019

Pointing to the Future

India’s Answer to the Belt and Road: A Road Map for South Asia.  India is not opposed to infrastructure development in the region, but it is concerned about the strategic implications of certain Chinese-led initiatives.

China’s Risky Gambit on Jaish and Terrorism.  By repeatedly blocking a move to ban a terrorist with established credentials and a long record of plotting attacks on India, China may have also risked its business relationship with India, one of the fastest-growing markets in the world.

China’s “South Asia challenge” for the Belt and Road Initiative.  China’s South Asia policy has long been centred on maintaining a strategic balance in the region, often pitching nuclear Pakistan against nuclear India.  However, of late, there is a growing consensus within the Chinese strategic circles that a politically stable, economically buoyant India has more room to manoeuvre in the field of diplomacy.

India Must Do a China To Avoid a Trade War With the US.  The withdrawal of India’s preferential trade treatment has added a note of strain in an otherwise robust bilateral strategic partnership between India and the US. However, as the Chinese have shown, a pragmatic problem solving approach is likely to yield India much greater dividends than an openly confrontational one.

Vernacular India is the Next Big Internet Wave.  India’s internet is about to spiral into one of the largest segments in the world. 400 million new consumers will be using the internet for the first time and none of them will be English speaking.

Private Sector Has a Major Role to Play in Indian Healthcare Delivery.  With India expected to become a US$10tn economy by 2030, it needs to increase its spend on healthcare as percentage of GDP by adopting cohesive collaboration with private providers for a new healthcare ecosystem.

The Mounting Challenges of a Two-Speed Indian Economy.  The sectoral growth rates tell us how the Indian private sector is growing at two speeds right now—one for agriculture and one for the other parts. The two speed economy continue to be one of the central challenges in Indian political economy and has implications for Indian politics, as well as economics, in the months ahead.

China’s Bid for the Heart and Soul of Italy.  Italy has officially joined China’s Belt and Road. But at home and abroad, not everyone is happy with the move.

Why America is Losing the Plot in Asia.  America’s leading role in Asia has been challenged by the deepening cooperation among Asian states, and particularly the emergence of Asian-led initiatives and institutions to develop connectivity and foster strategic cooperation.

How The U.S. and China Can Compete and Cooperate On Artificial Intelligence.  Despite their diverging approaches, China and the U.S. should work together to better capture the benefits of AI while simultaneously reducing its risks, leading to sharing best practices for deploying new technologies and monitoring their use.

A Battle Over Data Is the New Front In the US-China Trade War.  The background battle between American and Chinese intelligence agencies for hegemony over sensitive user data is yet another frontier in the ongoing US-China trade war.

The Problem With Xi’s China Model.  As Xi Jinping begins his second five-year term as CCP general secretary and (soon) president, there are signs that the new model’s very successes are becoming liabilities.

Australia–India Ties: Closing the Gap Between Intent and Action.  Australia’s economic exposure and potential vulnerability to China requires them to diversify its economic risks. Meanwhile, India is undergoing an aspirational shift with rising demand and desire for better goods and services and can match its priorities with Australia’s strengths in varied sectors, going beyond energy, resources, and China.