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In a world with 9 billion inter-connected people, power will come from creating peace, prosperity and freedom and this will require breakthroughs in how we live, enabled by a transformation in the very definition of power itself



THE WORLD AND THE FUTURE

The Shape of the World to Come – Part III: The Path to a New World Order
The Shape of the World to Come – Part III: The Path to a New World Order

The third part of our series on the Shape of the World to Come attempts to describe the transition to and the shape of the New World Order.  In this undertaking, we examine the opportunity for a peaceful transition to the future and the potential for a violent one.

The Shape of the World to Come – Part II:  The Key Challenges Facing the World
The Shape of the World to Come – Part II: The Key Challenges Facing the World

The second part of our series on the Shape of the World to Come presents the big issues that are driving people to support more extreme positions at the electoral box.  These issues might not only undermine some of the important progress achieved but also set the path for a new world order to emerge from conflict and competition.

The Shape of the World to Come – Part I: How the World is Progressing
The Shape of the World to Come – Part I: How the World is Progressing

In the first of a three part series on the Shape of the World to Come the Sign looks at the key elements of progress made globally.  Despite the challenges facing the world today, we live in a time of unprecedented progress and improving lives across a number of critical dimensions.

The US Election in Context – We Live in Revolutionary Times: The Prelude to the New World Order
The US Election in Context – We Live in Revolutionary Times: The Prelude to the New World Order

Both the Trump and Brexit votes have taken place within the context of revolutionary history. Looking ahead there is the potential for more revolutions to come, with significant implications for the world.

South China Seas: With Greater Power Comes Greater Responsibility
South China Seas: With Greater Power Comes Greater Responsibility

The ruling by the international tribunal in the Hague on the South China Seas dispute between the Philippines and China has significant potential security implications.  If not well handled, the ruling bears wide ranging risks for China on sovereignty disputes with India, Japan and almost all its neighbours and in domestic matters too.

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FROM THE FRONTLINE OF CHANGE

Featured : The Need for Conscious Capitalism. A brief discussion with Michael Gelb, best-selling author, about what businesses and investors can and should do to make capitalism more conscious and creative.

The Need for Conscious Capitalism

There has been a marked shift over the last several years with both investors and businesses increasingly developing a more holistic approach focused on both profit maximisation and having a positive social impact on various stakeholders including customers, suppliers, employees, and the overall environment. With the world facing unprecedented risks[1] in terms of rising inequality, environmental degradation[2], national populism[3], the urgency of investors and businesses adopting a more ‘conscious’ approach to capitalism is all the more important.

Michael J. Gelb and Raj Sisodia are two of the leading authorities on how businesses and leaders can evolve towards and benefit from a more comprehensive and caring approach to managing their various stakeholders. In their upcoming book, The Healing Organization: Awakening the Conscience of Business to Help Save the World, they discuss the need and rationale for businesses to transform, along with various examples of how companies have benefited by adopting such an approach. Greater Pacific Capital talks to Michael about their journey and what businesses and investors can and should do to make capitalism more conscious and creative.

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Addressing India’s Literacy Challenge

Addressing India’s Literacy Challenge
A brief discussion with Sourav Banerjee, India Country Director for Room to Read, a global non-profit organisation whose mission is to tackle the problem of childhood literacy across the developing world

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Revolution and Information Revolution

Revolution and the Information Revolution

A brief discussion with Jon Miller, the former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Digital Media Group and Chief Digital Officer for News Corporation.

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Reflections on India in the BRICs; Who You Calling a BRIC?

Reflections on India and the BRICS; who you calling a BRIC

Interview with and article by Jim O’Neill, the former chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management who coined the term “BRICS”.

Archived Articles

Pointing to the Future in      October 2019

Pointing to the Future

U.S.-India Maritime Security Cooperation.  Given that India is increasingly concerned about the Chinese naval presence in the Indian Ocean, the United States is a natural partner in enabling India to expand its technological and planning capabilities.

The Way Forward in Hong Kong.  Given the escalating violent protests across the country, a right balance needs to be found between the interests of Hong Kong and China, difficult though this may be politically.

India-Saudi Arabia Ties: Scaling New Heights.  India’s relationship with Saudi Arabia has become multifaceted due to the impetus given by the leaderships of both countries to other areas besides energy, including defense, maritime security, counterterrorism, science and technology, strategic oil reserves, investments and tourism.

India is Redefining Its Role in the Politics of the Middle East.  India’s progression in relations with Saudi Arabia highlights that the areas of cooperation between India and the countries of the Middle East have expanded, allowing India to not only strengthen bilateral relations but also allowing it to play a greater role in that region.

Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) as a Trade Opportunity Rather than Threat.  India has been poor in accessing Global Value Chains (GVCs)—c.16%—but the opportunity to change that is by way of the RCEP deal, which is important for the country’s strategic interests, and to resuscitate a rules-based international trading order.

China Adjusts to the New World Order.  With the outside world increasingly rejecting engagement, China’s leaders have been working to counter the backlash against globalization and have reconfirmed their commitment to continued reform and opening up the economy.

No Art to the US-China Trade Deal.  The phase one accord of the trade deal has the same basic structure from trade to currency – prescribing bilateral remedies for multilateral problems.

US-China Trade Talks: No Deal Yet, but a Breakthrough of Sorts.  The phase one agreement with China suggests the US is beginning to develop a more realistic expectation of what agreement is possible to achieve in this long quarrel, and what not.

China, the Pacific, and the “Debt Trap” Question.  The sheer scale of Chinese lending to countries in the Pacific, combined with inadequate controls to avoid potentially unsustainable loans could result in countries rapidly entering risky territory in terms of their overall burden of debt.

Economic Ties Hinge on China Addressing Strategic Concerns.  China cannot expect a robust trade and technology relationship with India even as it continues to scuttle India’s rise on the global stage and remains insensitive to India’s core security concerns.

China’s Carbon Emissions Trading Scheme: Smoke and Mirrors.  China’s upcoming national carbon emissions trading scheme (ETS) will not feature an overall cap on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, rather a CO2 intensity trading scheme, which will not necessarily be the most effective method to tackle climate change.

India’s Quest for Jobs: A Policy Agenda.  With two-thirds of the country’s population below age thirty-five, employing this massive supply of labour is, perhaps, the biggest challenge facing India for which it requires high economic growth for the next three decades that must be sustainable, broad-based, and focused on creating new jobs.

Foreign Capital Could Kick-Start the Country’s Investment Cycle.  For India to become a US$5tn economy by 2024, it needs to focus on attracting foreign capital up to US$30bn every year, in addition to the usual foreign direct investment and portfolio flows, for the foreseeable future.