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In a world with 9 billion inter-connected people, power will come from creating peace, prosperity and freedom and this will require breakthroughs in how we live, enabled by a transformation in the very definition of power itself



THE WORLD AND THE FUTURE

The Shape of the World to Come – Part III: The Path to a New World Order
The Shape of the World to Come – Part III: The Path to a New World Order

The third part of our series on the Shape of the World to Come attempts to describe the transition to and the shape of the New World Order.  In this undertaking, we examine the opportunity for a peaceful transition to the future and the potential for a violent one.

The Shape of the World to Come – Part II:  The Key Challenges Facing the World
The Shape of the World to Come – Part II: The Key Challenges Facing the World

The second part of our series on the Shape of the World to Come presents the big issues that are driving people to support more extreme positions at the electoral box.  These issues might not only undermine some of the important progress achieved but also set the path for a new world order to emerge from conflict and competition.

The Shape of the World to Come – Part I: How the World is Progressing
The Shape of the World to Come – Part I: How the World is Progressing

In the first of a three part series on the Shape of the World to Come the Sign looks at the key elements of progress made globally.  Despite the challenges facing the world today, we live in a time of unprecedented progress and improving lives across a number of critical dimensions.

The US Election in Context – We Live in Revolutionary Times: The Prelude to the New World Order
The US Election in Context – We Live in Revolutionary Times: The Prelude to the New World Order

Both the Trump and Brexit votes have taken place within the context of revolutionary history. Looking ahead there is the potential for more revolutions to come, with significant implications for the world.

South China Seas: With Greater Power Comes Greater Responsibility
South China Seas: With Greater Power Comes Greater Responsibility

The ruling by the international tribunal in the Hague on the South China Seas dispute between the Philippines and China has significant potential security implications.  If not well handled, the ruling bears wide ranging risks for China on sovereignty disputes with India, Japan and almost all its neighbours and in domestic matters too.

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FROM THE FRONTLINE OF CHANGE

Featured : Addressing India’s Literacy Challenge A brief discussion with Sourav Banerjee, India Country Director for Room to Read, a global non-profit organisation whose mission is to tackle the problem of childhood literacy across the developing world

Addressing India’s Literacy Challenge

The Sign of the Times has written extensively about the importance of education and skill development for India to fully realise its demographic advantage and thereby achieve economic development. Approximately a quarter of India’s population is illiterate, and by virtue of its sheer size, India has the largest illiterate population in the world, accounting for c.40% of the world’s illiterate population. This is disproportionately skewed towards women and girls, approximately a third of whom lack even basic literacy skills, and has therefore limited women’s ability to choose how they participate in the economy.

Addressing India’s literacy and education challenges, along with the large gender gap, clearly requires transformative solutions. In this context, Greater Pacific Capital talks to Sourav Banerjee, Country Director for Room to Read in India. Room to Read is a global non-profit organisation whose mission is to tackle the problem of childhood literacy across the developing world.

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Image 5 The Frontline

Revolution and Information Revolution

Revolution and the Information Revolution

A brief discussion with Jon Miller, the former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Digital Media Group and Chief Digital Officer for News Corporation.

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Reflections on India in the BRICs; Who You Calling a BRIC?

Reflections on India and the BRICS; who you calling a BRIC

Interview with and article by Jim O’Neill, the former chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management who coined the term “BRICS”.

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Interpreting Gandhi’s Principles of Non-Violence for Today’s World

Interpreting Gandhi’s Principles of Non-Violence for Today’s World

Lecture by Rajni Bakshi, Gandhi Peace Fellow at Gateway House: Indian Council on Global Relations

Archived Articles

Pointing to the Future in December 2018

Tokyo and Delhi: Expanding Strategic Collaborations in the Indo-Pacific.  The India-Japan annual summit has underlined the importance of strategic cooperation between the countries and laid out the foundations for a stronger operational strategic collaboration between the two countries.

India, China, and the INF Treaty.  As the US conflict with Russia deepens, both India and China’s partnership with Russia on advanced military systems will come under increasing scrutiny and pressure.

Modi and Abe: Judgement Waits on India-Japan Ties.  Given their strong personal relationship, if both Modi and Abe continue in their positions after the elections in 2019 across both countries, the India-Japan cooperation and implementation of plans should move forward with greater speed.

A Concert of Indo-Pacific Democracies. The India-Japan dyad forming the cornerstone of efforts to pursue wider collaboration in the region serves the goal of forestalling the emergence of a China-centric Asia.

The Myth of China’s Forced Technology Transfer.  With China now second only to the US in terms of paying for foreign technology, it is clear that a large and growing share of technology transfer is not “forced”.

China’s Four Traps.  China’s leaders must navigate complex and conflicting pressures, as they seek to address domestic economic inequalities, manage relations with an insecure and isolationist US, cooperate effectively with the rest of the world, and pursue effective climate action.

The Limits of China’s Charm Offensive.  If China wants to secure reliable allies across East Asia to withstand strategic conflict with the US, it will have to make far greater concessions on security issues.

China Engages ASEAN to Build Mutual Trust. The recent China – Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) maritime excercises are of considerable significance as they demonstrate China’s keenness to boost ties with the ASEAN on security issues.

The Cooperative Rivalry of US-China Relations.  China and the U.S. both currently face transnational challenges that are impossible to resolve without the other, which makes the current US-China relations a “cooperative rivalry” rather than a Cold War.

Incentivizing Private Sector R&D in India.  While India has experimented with tax and economic policies to stimulate home-grown innovation, its restrictive eligibility rules compared to other jurisdictions may mitigate against India establishing itself as an attractive R&D destination.

Lack of Political Will Behind India’s Agrarian Crisis.  The long-term solution for the Agricultural sector is not by political parties offering loan waivers to farmers but by governments making serious investments in agriculture to make it viable, along with a price support mechanism which takes care of the market inefficiencies.

Beijing’s Online Gaming Clampdown.  The Chinese regulators concerns over gaming’s addictive qualities and its impact on the health of the nation’s young people, have resulted in no new games being approved from March this year. This crackdown on the sector suggests a major slowdown for gaming companies in the world’s largest gaming market.

Feminism and Femininity in Xi Jinping’s “New Era”.  The Chinese government has tightened its censorship of feminist ideas and activism over the last year in line with President Xi Jinping’s ongoing campaign to “reinforce traditional family values”.