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In a world with 9 billion inter-connected people, power will come from creating peace, prosperity and freedom and this will require breakthroughs in how we live, enabled by a transformation in the very definition of power itself



THE WORLD AND THE FUTURE

The Shape of the World to Come – Part III: The Path to a New World Order
The Shape of the World to Come – Part III: The Path to a New World Order

The third part of our series on the Shape of the World to Come attempts to describe the transition to and the shape of the New World Order.  In this undertaking, we examine the opportunity for a peaceful transition to the future and the potential for a violent one.

The Shape of the World to Come – Part II:  The Key Challenges Facing the World
The Shape of the World to Come – Part II: The Key Challenges Facing the World

The second part of our series on the Shape of the World to Come presents the big issues that are driving people to support more extreme positions at the electoral box.  These issues might not only undermine some of the important progress achieved but also set the path for a new world order to emerge from conflict and competition.

The Shape of the World to Come – Part I: How the World is Progressing
The Shape of the World to Come – Part I: How the World is Progressing

In the first of a three part series on the Shape of the World to Come the Sign looks at the key elements of progress made globally.  Despite the challenges facing the world today, we live in a time of unprecedented progress and improving lives across a number of critical dimensions.

The US Election in Context – We Live in Revolutionary Times: The Prelude to the New World Order
The US Election in Context – We Live in Revolutionary Times: The Prelude to the New World Order

Both the Trump and Brexit votes have taken place within the context of revolutionary history. Looking ahead there is the potential for more revolutions to come, with significant implications for the world.

South China Seas: With Greater Power Comes Greater Responsibility
South China Seas: With Greater Power Comes Greater Responsibility

The ruling by the international tribunal in the Hague on the South China Seas dispute between the Philippines and China has significant potential security implications.  If not well handled, the ruling bears wide ranging risks for China on sovereignty disputes with India, Japan and almost all its neighbours and in domestic matters too.

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FROM THE FRONTLINE OF CHANGE

Featured : Addressing India’s Literacy Challenge A brief discussion with Sourav Banerjee, India Country Director for Room to Read, a global non-profit organisation whose mission is to tackle the problem of childhood literacy across the developing world

Addressing India’s Literacy Challenge

The Sign of the Times has written extensively about the importance of education and skill development for India to fully realise its demographic advantage and thereby achieve economic development. Approximately a quarter of India’s population is illiterate, and by virtue of its sheer size, India has the largest illiterate population in the world, accounting for c.40% of the world’s illiterate population. This is disproportionately skewed towards women and girls, approximately a third of whom lack even basic literacy skills, and has therefore limited women’s ability to choose how they participate in the economy.

Addressing India’s literacy and education challenges, along with the large gender gap, clearly requires transformative solutions. In this context, Greater Pacific Capital talks to Sourav Banerjee, Country Director for Room to Read in India. Room to Read is a global non-profit organisation whose mission is to tackle the problem of childhood literacy across the developing world.

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Image 5 The Frontline

Revolution and Information Revolution

Revolution and the Information Revolution

A brief discussion with Jon Miller, the former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Digital Media Group and Chief Digital Officer for News Corporation.

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Reflections on India in the BRICs; Who You Calling a BRIC?

Reflections on India and the BRICS; who you calling a BRIC

Interview with and article by Jim O’Neill, the former chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management who coined the term “BRICS”.

Frontline 3

Interpreting Gandhi’s Principles of Non-Violence for Today’s World

Interpreting Gandhi’s Principles of Non-Violence for Today’s World

Lecture by Rajni Bakshi, Gandhi Peace Fellow at Gateway House: Indian Council on Global Relations

Archived Articles

Pointing to the Future in       April 2017

Pointing to the Future

The Temptations of a Resilient China.  The combination of near-term resilience and an inward-looking US appears to offer a tantalizing opportunity for China. But China should resist the temptations of global power projection and stay focused on executing its domestic strategy. The challenge now is to realize the “tremendous opportunity” that Li touted in ruling out a hard landing.

Political Indoctrination in Chinese Colleges.  Among Chinese college students, support for the Party and government remain strong—at least on paper. However, most students have shown their dissatisfaction with Ideological and Political Education and their inability to intake additional political coursework void of liberal teaching methods.

China’s Power Projection in the Western Indian Ocean.  There seems little doubt that China is strengthening its ability to protect Chinese interests in the Western Indian Ocean region and setting the stage for power projection even further. A strong case can be made for maximising U.S. cooperation with India in an effort to minimize future conflict and enhance regional stability.

Assessing Institutional Rules in China’s Elite Selection: The Case of Ethnic Minority Leaders.  This brief review of the appointment patterns of ethnic minority leaders indicates how institutional rules and norms factor into the selection of ethnic elites.

China’s Emerging Institutional Statecraft.  Attempts by China to enshrine new rules, practices, or norms will require the cooperation of other states and thus compromise from Beijing. Defenders of the liberal international order can therefore take heart that while compliance rates may fall, an illiberal alternative is unlikely to take its place.

Elite Promotion under Xi Jinping.   Governance experience in remote hardship regions is emerging as a common feature among China’s most prominent political leaders. Although these leaders have traversed a range of career trajectories, they each have benefited professionally from serving in poor, remote provinces.

The Sino-American Employment Challenge.  Both Xi and Trump seemed to recognize that a stable US-China relationship is necessary to enable them to focus on their respective challenges. As the world’s two largest consumer markets and leading trade partners, China and the US can do much to help each other overcome the barriers to increased, broad-based, and high-quality job creation.

Muslim Anxieties and India’s Future.  The appointment of Adityanathin in Uttar Pradesh seems to indicate that the BJP will employ anti-Muslim animus in its effort to consolidate Hindu votes in the 2019 national elections. But that strategy is clearly at odds with Modi’s rhetorical focus on economic development.