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The Leader and the Sign of the Times

India’s Transition to the Information Age, and the Sectors Driving This

India’s Transition to the Information Age, and the Sectors Driving This

India’s attractiveness as a destination for international investors has been increasing in the context of both its projected high growth as well as the ongoing shifts in risk among major economies and investment destinations. A previous Leader in the Sign of the Times demonstrated how India was improving its relative positioning in terms of risk-adjusted returns vis-à-vis other major markets, having not only improved returns during the past decade but, uniquely among major economies, having simultaneously reduced risk. In order for international policy makers seeking to build their relationship with India and also for international investors seeking to participate successfully in this market, they will need to form a clear view on the sectors that will drive India forward. This will require them to understand the value, growth and risk dynamics of India’s various industries, and how they are changing. The Modi government has developed an ambitious blueprint for the future of India encompassing increasing manufacturing, agricultural reform, and the growth of services, particularly in the digital space. However, the nature of Indian industry stands to be quite different from the rest of the world’s given that its mass industrialisation is occurring in the information and internet era, while all other major economies came of age in the industrial era . This more than any other factor needs to drive both policy decisions at home and abroad as well as investment allocations abroad. Any successful India allocation strategy will also need to tap into the country’s core macro-economic drivers, aligning with government priorities and recognising the local and global challenges facing potential target industries. This imperative is not lessened by the more free-market characteristics of India. Indeed, it may be even more critical for a successful investor to understand sectors where there is less government-led surety of outcomes. This month’s Sign of the Times examines the risks and opportunities facing major industries and their sub-sectors in India in the face of its unique transition, and attempts to provide a perspective on how international investors might participate in the most attractive segments of the country’s economy.

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India’s Rising, Risk Falling August 2017

India today continues to be the world’s fastest growing major economy. At nearly 8% annual GDP growth, India handily outgrows its closest major competitors and neighbours such as China (at c.6.0% growth) and Indonesia (at c.5.5% growth). In addition to this fundamental shift in growth, there is another equally important shift occurring, that of risk. With India entering into a phase of increasing political and economic stability, and with the momentum of structural reforms building up at a strong pace under the Modi government, the country’s fundamental risk profile is changing at the exact moment when developments in other major markets, developed and developing, are either leading to increased risk, lower growth, or both. The United States is rapidly reaching political stasis as both the executive and legislative branches find themselves encumbered by effective resistance, while the problems of Brexit and the need to rethink the European programme are creating uncertainty in the EU and the potential exhaustion of Abenomics in Japan is leading to doubts over its economic path ahead. Meanwhile, China, after two decades of rapid growth, has moved to a lower growth trajectory with an increasing risk profile. At this stage, the global risk-reward profile is fundamentally shifting, with major regions being re-rated across both axes. India appears to be a strong beneficiary, away from the global trend-line, improving its relative positioning in terms of risk-adjusted returns vis-a-vis other major markets. It is a good time for India to continue its focus on executing the reforms that address structural and systemic risks while driving economic higher to potentially double digits.

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Path to Power: India’s Great Opportunity in the Changing World Order July 2017

Last month’s Sign of the Times highlighted what appear to be a series of US retreats from global leadership positions. With the geopolitical cards, apparently being reshuffled across a wide range of defence, political and economic areas, America’s apparent withdrawal is creating opportunities for countries seeking to fill the resulting void, with China currently taking the most proactive steps among the potential contenders. Beijing has already made clear its intent to play a more active role in matters of globalisation, international trade and climate change, global issues that also align well with China’s domestic agenda and where it can leverage significant political and financial assets. Despite China’s head start over others and its apparent desire to lead, its efforts will likely face not only resistance from the West but also competition from a number of countries, both within Asia and abroad. Further, China’s inability to lead on a broader set of issues related to matters such as human rights or regional security acts as a counter-weight to its leadership efforts and provides opportunities for other countries to fill the gaps being left by the United States. Among potential contenders for regional and international leadership, India, as the world’s fastest growing economy, the largest democracy and (potentially ) the most populous country, clearly has critical assets to leverage across a number of spheres. Bringing these to bear though will require India to be far more bold and strategic in handling both international affairs and in making strong domestic progress, both are matters that have proved elusive to date. However, if India can achieve this, it has the potential to create a virtuous circle of domestic development and international leadership similar to the one that has underwritten US prosperity for over two generations.

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The Evolving US-China Relationship in the Age of Trump June 2017

The first 120-odd days of the Trump administration have taught us to expect the unexpected. Events are moving so quickly news and even White House officials are struggling to keep up with the new cycle. While speed and the uncertainty it brings are unsettling to many people in America, it is perhaps even more alarming to its diplomats, who have spent decades carefully crafting policies to shape the relations with both America’s partners and competitors abroad. Among these relationships, arguably none is more important than the one with China, being the defining geopolitical relationship of the first half of the 21st century given the potential of China to be a rival or an ally, and so none is more critical to keep on stable and manageable tram lines. As a 5,000 year old civilisation, China takes short term events within the context of a long-term perspective of events and relationships and defines its strategies and policies accordingly. Its current leaders have a ten-year mandate to rule without the risks and distractions of mid-term elections or legislatives controlled by opposition parties and there has developed a continuity of vision regarding China’s development that has been in place since its opening up 35 years ago.

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Good News

Good News

A quick preview of the good news

Addressing India’s Literacy Challenge

The Frontline

Addressing India’s Literacy Challenge
A brief discussion with Sourav Banerjee, India Country Director for Room to Read, a global non-profit organisation whose mission is to tackle the problem of childhood literacy across the developing world

Investing in the New India Story

The Investor

Investing in the “New India Story” – a brief guide to the key considerations
Also: Analysis of GST and its implications for investing in India

The Big Picture TEST, Metrics

The Big Picture TEST, Metrics

A slowdown in business activity in the aftermath of the rollout of the Goods and Services Tax (GST) continued to impede the Indian economy’s growth in July. Whereas the Chinese economy fared well in the month, with increases in factory output and trade data.

This Month Through China’s Eyes

This Month Through China’s Eyes

Reactions to the border standoff at Doklam between India and China, the protests in Charlottesville and the collision of a US guided missile destroyer with a shipping vessel near the straits of Malacca

Last Month Through India’s Eyes

Last Month Through India’s Eyes

Reactions to the on-going military standoff between India and China, the recently concluded presidential elections in India and to the change in government in Bihar

Pointing to the Future

Pointing to the Future

India’s 70th anniversary, US and India’s leadership roles in Indo-pacific, Rupee appreciation and India economy, energy policies in India and China, the US-China relationship

Big News

Big News

India and China end Himalayan border stand-off, Indian Railways to get $44 billion safety revamp, SoftBank’s Vision Fund invest US$2.5bn in India’s Flipkart, US Launches formal trade investigation into China, China moves to curb overseas acquisitions, RMB at strongest in nearly 11 months

About Greater Pacific

Greater Pacific Capital is an investing institution designed to identify and develop investing opportunities based on the use of distinctive global macro thematic thinking, strategy development and the application of capital to its selected target markets Read More

vision and history

To create the leading platform to finance the growth and international positioning of enterprises in its target areas which for its first funds are in India and establish other links with global economies Read More

ideas and thinking

Succeeding in situations that are dynamically shaped by the aspirations of rising peoples, their society, markets and rapidly changing environments - where rules seem to apply but are often rewritten and so require unusual thinking. Read More

investments

We recognise the complex, nascent and rapidly developing and volatile nature of this ancient country's modern markets and economy as they grow and expand internationally and seek to work as partners with leaders who wish to create value from ideas. Read More

team

Our people are international and local, measured and open, imaginative and mathematical, a team and individuals, principals and counsel, skilled and learning... learning to open their own boundaries and others. Read More

philosophy

Our philosophy guides us and also places high demands upon us as we journey in a world that is changing dramatically all around us ... we endeavour to appreciate that the journey itself will make us more fit to journey. Read More

our locations

Greater Pacific Capital operates out of offices in Mumbai, Shanghai, Singapore and London. The firm's investors are international including from the US, Canada, Japan, Europe and the Middle East. Read More